Sector News

Barry Callebaut names Unilever food boss as new CEO

June 10, 2015
Food & Drink
(Reuters) – Swiss chocolate maker Barry Callebaut (BARN.S) has appointed Unilever (ULVR.L) food business head Antoine de Saint-Affrique as its new chief executive, replacing Juergen Steinemann, who is stepping down in August.
 
“With Antoine de Saint-Affrique, the board has appointed a new CEO with an impressive track record in the food industry,” the Zurich-based company said in statement on Wednesday.
 
De Saint-Affrique, who will take up his new job in October, is currently head of Unilever’s food division and an independent director of Essilor (ESSI.PA), the world’s largest maker of ophthalmic lenses.
 
Separately, Unilever named Briton Amanda Sourry to replace de Saint-Affrique. Sourry, a Unilever veteran, currently leads the company’s hair products division, after stints running its British and Irish business and its global Spreads & Dressings division.
 
(Reporting by Katharina Bart; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman and Jane Merriman)

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