Sector News

Women on boards: open your eyes to the opportunities offered by SMEs

November 19, 2014
Diversity & Inclusion
There is a well-known Jamaican saying: “me lickle but me talawa,” which means both “don’t underestimate me” and “I may be small but I am mighty”. When I think about my own personal strategy for career growth, I have always had this in the back of my mind. In part this is because I have always had board level and leadership aspirations, and I mean always: at 15 I proudly declared to anyone that would listen that I wanted to be a CEO.
 
The main reason for my connection to this saying was that I knew I would be (if my career took the path I hoped it would) the youngest person on a board, probably the only or one of a few women and more than likely the only person of colour. It hurts to think that the picture at 15 is pretty much the same at 31 – diversity hasn’t improved at the rate it should, but that’s a whole other article.
 
So my strategy became what I call “food-chaining myself.” I would create and find opportunities to lead, in my own business and also in others. Given the statistics on women and people from ethnic backgrounds on FTSE 100, 250, 500 boards, I decided I’d cut my teeth elsewhere.
 
What I found is that the doors to board-level leadership are much more open in SMEs and the third sector. Especially for women. Why? My first assumption is that these businesses operate less of a closed “boys club” recruitment policy and don’t automatically gravitate towards “people like me” when thinking about what leaders they want on their team. They see talent first. They also recognise the competitive advantage of having a diverse board: I don’t mean visually, I mean in terms of experience, understanding of the world, clients, customers and industries. They don’t see new blood as a threat.
 
I accept that sitting on a board of a small or medium sized business or a startup might not have the same CV clout as say M&S or Facebook, but I can guarantee that the experience and opportunity is just as powerful. I would add that joining third sector and charity boards also opens up a world of insight and challenge that even a seasoned business professional can learn from.
 
On the board of UnLtd we have an endowment of £100 million, I have had to learn how to understand investment strategy and contribute effectively to discussions about our portfolio. On the board of the Consortium for Street Kids I was exposed to all of the planning that goes into getting a UN day ratified. My first board, the British Youth Council, helped me cut my teeth in advocacy and political engagement. Now as the chair of NCVYS (National Council for Voluntary Youth Services) and a non-executive of a portfolio of startups, I am in alternating discussions about strategy and investments, people and talent, resourcing and growth.
 
The exposure is priceless and I can directly see the impact of what I am saying, doing and driving in these organisations and businesses because they are smaller and welcome the extra pair of hands.
 
Here are my personal tips on navigating the boardroom.
 
Start small
 
By small, I mean in a startup or local charity. Get to grips with what good board governance is and isn’t before committing yourself to something bigger. Bigger is not always better either.
 
Follow your passions
 
Join a board that does something you love or are passionate about. This means you’ll have no problem sitting in a room for five hours staring at projections, because you are connected to the mission, vision and delivery of the business.
 
Always speak up
 
Do not let a meeting pass without contributing. This is controversial, I have friends that say they’d rather not say anything in meetings if they don’t have something smart to say. In my experience it’s usually the simplest question that is the most pertinent.
 
Ask questions
 
Don’t be afraid of saying you don’t understand something. Nine times out of ten no one else does either and there is a collective sigh of relief that someone was brave enough to say so.
 
By Natalie Campbell
 
Source: The Guardian

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

What has (and hasn’t) changed about being a Chief Diversity Officer

Diversity & Inclusion

In the wake of George Floyd’s murder, corporate interest in DEI is higher than ever. But has this increased attention racial justice and inequity led to real, meaningful change? The authors conducted interviews with more than 40 CDOs before and after summer 2020 and identified four major shifts in how these leaders perceived their companies’ engagement with DEI.

September 17, 2022

3 workplace biases that derail mid-career women

Diversity & Inclusion

Mid-career women are often surprised by the levels of bias and discrimination they encounter in the workplace, especially if they’ve successfully avoided it earlier in their careers. After speaking to 100 senior women executives, the authors identified three distinct kinds of bias and discrimination faced by mid-career women. They describe each bias and conclude with recommendations for overcoming them.

September 11, 2022

Working women and the war for talent

Diversity & Inclusion

Bain research shows that men and women have consistent motivations when it comes to work, across factors like financial orientation and camaraderie. They also have similar attitudes on inclusion, with fewer than 30% feeling included in the workplace. Despite a lack of intrinsic differences, women and men continue to have different outcomes and experiences at work, due to meaningful imbalances in occupation choice, prioritization of flexibility, and the perpetuation of biases.