Sector News

The robot-proof skills that give women an edge in the age of AI

February 21, 2019
Diversity & Inclusion

The latest panic about artificial intelligence is that it will deal a blow to women in the workplace. Women accustomed to gloomy headlines may have met this one with a fatalistic shrug. But it is worth interrogating why on earth it might be true.

The concerns are legitimate enough, but they fail to appreciate the big ways in which the world of work is going to change. In fact, it is quite possible the age of AI will belong to women. Men are the ones in danger of being left behind.

> Read the full article on the Financial Times website

By Sarah O’Connor

Source: Financial Times

comments closed

Related News

July 3, 2022

Are your organization’s DEI efforts superficial or structural?

Diversity & Inclusion

What can organizations do to determine if their DEI initiatives are mere scaffolds or performative solidarity — or whether they’re actually positioned to put racial and gender equity at the center of the company’s core values and move the needle on change.

June 24, 2022

The real reason diversity is lacking at the top

Diversity & Inclusion

It’s a persistent myth: if a company recruits enough employees from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, a sufficient number will, over time, rise through the organization to create a diverse culture at all levels. But that is not happening.

June 19, 2022

BIO: ‘Diversity candidates’ and knowledge ‘shortfalls’: Women in biotech say ‘I’m here to do my job’ despite toxic tropes

Diversity & Inclusion

The script at BIO this year could not have been more clear: Progress on diversity is being made, but more work needs to be done. Yet still, an undercurrent of biotech’s all-boys brand-of-old tugged at the heels of efforts to bolster those long-excluded from positions of authority.