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The 5 highest-paid female CEOs of 2014

May 18, 2015
Diversity & Inclusion
Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer was the highest-paid female executive last year, taking home $42.1 million, according to a new list from The New York Times.
 
However, Mayer’s haul still puts her at just 14th overall among the highest-paid CEOs. Thirteen male CEOs made more than she did. In fact, of the 200 chief executives on The Times’ list, only 13 were women.
 
Additionally, The Times reports, “their average pay, $20 million, is 9.4% less than $22.6 million overall average.”
 
The highest-paid CEO overall in 2014 was David Zaslav, who made $156.1 million for leading Discovery Communications.
 
Here’s what the top 5 female CEOs made, and how they ranked overall:
 
  • Marissa Mayer, Yahoo — $42.1 million (14th overall)
  • Martine Rothblatt, United Therapeutics — $31.6 million (24th overall)
  • Carol Mayrowitz, TJX Companies — $23.3 million (54th overall)
  • Meg Whitman, Hewlett-Packard — $19.6 million (72nd overall)
  • Indra Nooyi, PepsiCo — $19.1 million (81st overall)
 

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