Sector News

Female-Led Firms Have More Female Board Members

November 13, 2014
Diversity & Inclusion
Surprise, surprise.
 
Companies with female CEOs are more likely to have at least three women in the boardroom, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday.
 
Roughly 54 percent of the 67 companies in the S&P 500 with a female CEO have at least three female board members, far higher than the 15.5 percent of such firms led by men, the report said. The report included analysis for The Wall Street Journal by governance researchers at MSCI Inc.
 
Among the notable companies with at least three female board members: General Motors Co., DuPont Co., Hewlett-Packard Co., International Business Machines Corp., PepsiCo Inc. and Xerox Corp., according to the Journal report.
 
What’s more, large firms with at least three female board members achieved far better financial results than those with none between 2004 and 2008, according to a 2011 study by nonprofit research group Catalyst cited in the Journal report.
 
By Frank Kalman
 

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