Sector News

Circular economy can bring benefits all round

October 22, 2019
Borderless Future

On first hearing, “Lego as a service” sounds like an April Fool’s joke or a PR parody. But the 87-year-old toymaker’s exploration of a rental service for its products is rooted in sensible sustainable thinking. In an era of dwindling resources, changing how products are treated is good for consumers, companies and the environment alike.

Lego’s sustainability drive stems from the formula behind its multi-hued bricks. The majority of the pieces produced each year are made from ABS, a plastic which gives them the grip which allows them to stay secure, but is reliant on petroleum. Renting Lego rather than allowing them to gather dust in attics could reduce the production demands. As the company itself admits, however, the idea is still only a proposal. Young customers and pieces known for vanishing under sofas do not make for an auspicious combination.

> Read the full article on the Financial Times website

Source: The Financial Times

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