Sector News

Start off on the right foot with a 90-day agenda

November 4, 2014
Borderless Leadership
You’ve found the right match for your skills, gotten the hiring manager’s attention, aced the interview and accepted a job offer, and you’re starting on Monday. Great!
 
Now it’s time for the really hard part to begin.
 
In today’s corporate world, the first days on the job are not a honeymoon. At many companies, the first three months of a new hire’s tenure are often seen as another long-form interview process to make sure you’re the right fit. If your managers don’t see sufficient growth, they may even rescind their offer.
 
As you start your new job, be sure you have at least an outline to guide you through your first few weeks and make the best possible impression.
 
First week: Get to know everyone.
 
Determine what your boss wants. The first person you want to impress is your direct supervisor. Get to know his or her work habits and communication style.
 
Schedule meetings with the rest of the team. Even if you won’t work with them every day, sit down with each person for 15 to 30 minutes to find out what they do and how you are connected.
 
Memorize your objectives. Make sure you understand exactly what is expected of you and how you can add value.
 
First month: Absorb anything and everything.
 
Ask lots of questions. Get to know the background of each business decision that is made. Don’t be afraid to feel like a pest to management. They’ll expect and welcome a rookie who shows enthusiasm.
 
Start with the low-hanging fruit. What are some easy tasks you can do to prove your worth? Get a few quick wins under your belt, and make sure they’re ahead of schedule and within budget.
 
Be flexible. Make it clear that you’re willing to give up a few lunch hours, come in early or stay late to meet a deadline and help out the team.
 
First 90 days: Let your voice be heard.
 
Seek feedback. Make it clear that you want to know how you’re progressing. Perhaps set up monthly or quarterly meetings with your boss to discuss performance expectations.
 
Track your successes. Ensure that supervisors are aware of your contributions by making a list of your accomplishments. Set daily, weekly and monthly goals, and record when and how they are exceeded.
 
Take on more challenges. Don’t wait to be given more responsibilities — ask for them. Make long-term goals for the year, describe how you will meet them and show how the company will benefit.
 
By Randy Woods 
 

comments closed

Related News

May 21, 2022

How to re-engage a dissatisfied employee

Borderless Leadership

The author surveyed 5,600 workers from various industries from January 2019 to December 2021, finding that worker dissatisfaction not only starts as early as age 25 — it’s been here since before the pandemic started. Her advice: aim for work-life alignment, not work-life balance. Find out what drives them as an individual — and reshape their jobs together. Engage them in the recruiting process.

May 15, 2022

Why the ‘4 + 1’ workweek is inevitable

Borderless Leadership

There’s been a lot of buzz about a 4-day workweek. But it will be the ‘4 + 1’ workweek that ultimately wins out: 4 days of “work” and 1 day of “learning.” Several forces are converging in a way that point toward the inevitability of this workplace future.

May 7, 2022

Managers, what are you doing about change exhaustion?

Borderless Leadership

How can leaders help their teams combat change exhaustion — or step out of its clutches? Too often, organizations simply encourage their employees to be resilient, placing the burden of finding ways to feel better solely on individuals. Leaders need to recognize that change exhaustion is not an individual issue, but a collective one that needs to be addressed at the team or organization level.