Sector News

No more first-day jitters

April 14, 2016
Borderless Leadership

Do you remember your first day on a new job? It was probably a little bit nerve-racking, wasn’t it? Most new hires are anxious the first time they pull up to a new workplace.

Although they’ve already landed a position with your company, they still have a lot to prove to you, the boss, and to their new teammates.

To help your new hires ease into their roles, here are seven ways to improve your onboarding process:

1. Send documentation ahead of time.

Before your new hire gets to the office, warm her up to your company by sharing documentation about your business. By giving her information about what she can expect, such as dress code, processes, and the people she’ll be working with, she’ll feel like she’s a part of the team before she starts on her first day.

2. Share the news with the rest of the team.

Perhaps one of the best ways to make your new hire feel welcome in your company is to share the big news. Don’t make him introduce himself to the staff. Show him you’re welcoming him on board with open arms by making an announcement and the introductions instead.

3. Teach her the lingo.

Every job comes with its fair share of lingo. Many times, new hires feel out of the loop because they haven’t quite caught onto all the jargon flying around the workplace. Fill your new hire in so she can communicate better and catch on faster.

4. Hold an etiquette lesson.

You might assume your new hire knows a thing or two about workplace etiquette, but that’s not always the case. Every office has its own standards of decorum. By holding a special etiquette lesson during the onboarding process, you minimize the risk of your new hire feeling embarrassed about doing something wrong unintentionally.

Teach your new hire important aspects of the job, such as how to manage schedule requests, how to manage lunch breaks, when to dress more formally, and when it’s okay to dress down. These are the types of standards that change from company to company, and sometimes from office to office.

5. Give a full tour.

You’ve walked these halls for years, but to your new hire, it’s all foreign. Show him everything he needs to know on a tour of your office. Some of the most crucial areas of your business will be the bathroom, break room, and where he is to store his personal belongings.

6. Start small.

Don’t let the training get too far ahead before you’re sure your new hire has caught on. Start with small, bite-sized assignments to help her ease into her new role. She won’t feel overwhelmed this way.

7. Have some fun.

In all, the process should be fun and exciting for your new hires. Start their job off on the right foot by making the onboarding process engaging and entertaining. They’ll appreciate the lighthearted spirit on a day when their nerves are undoubtedly high-strung, and you’ll appreciate the entertainment during what could become a repetitive process.

By Jon Forknell

Source: All Business

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