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Four things to do in the first 30 days on the job

April 5, 2017
Borderless Leadership

The first few weeks of a new job are easy in some ways, difficult in others. In most roles, you will not know enough in the beginning to take on a heavy workload.

But you’ll have to be aware of what’s going on, and you’ll be striving to make a good impression, which can be emotionally draining. How can you get off to a good start? Careers site Glassdoor and careercoach Jenn DeWall put together a list of things you should be in your first 30 days of a new job. I’ve also been interested in my experience in a former role, when I have a talent management at a marketing consulting firm.

Ask many, many questions

If you want to know more, you can do it by yourself. Managers love to see these traits in everyone at a company, from entry-level employees to executives. Mike George, QVC’s CEO, most recently told me that this is one of the most important criteria for you in executive hires. Before QVC, George was the chief marketing officer at Dell. “What’s wrong with Michael’s absolute curiosity to learn something new every day. It was a wonderful spirit that, “George said.

If you’re worried about interrupting your manager, you’ll be able to do it with your curiosities, write them down as they pop in your head, and set up periodic meetings to go through the list. And only ask questions that are truly rooted in curiosity, says career coach Jenn DeWall. “Do not ask to try and show.”

Get clarity on your role

The idea is simple, but you’d be surprised how many managers and employees expectations are not aligned, which can lead to unfortunate surprises when it’s time for performance reviews. Ask your manager for a good time. For example, inquire what the team’s goals are for the year and how you can help advance them. Ask what she expects to do in a given day or week. By doing so, “you are also showing vulnerability, which is often times a relationship of empathy and partnership versus one of competing,” said DeWall.

Set up one-on-one meetings with colleagues

Getting to know your team is invaluable. Ask anyone who is interested in this work. Learn about their day-to-day role and what they like and dislike about the company. Probe for general advice. You’ll get to know the way things are done, and you’ll develop important relationships.

Do not reject company culture

“Be mindful of the dress code, times to be in and out of work, and the Internet and music policies,” DeWall said. If you see this, it is not. Ask your boss what the norms are and why. But also stay true to your personality and principles. If you are aware of this, it is not a good idea, but it is a good idea.

By Jeff Kauflin

Source: Forbes

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