Sector News

Why the 30-hour work week is almost here

February 15, 2018
Sustainability

A friend who recruits for an investment bank grumbled to me recently about millennial job applicants. He said that at interview they ask questions like: “Can I leave early on Friday afternoons to go to yoga?”

Surveys have shown for years that most millennials — male and female — don’t want to work all hours. In recent studies by Deloitte and career-monitoring website Comparably, younger workers placed “work-life balance” above career progression. Millennials want to get home on time to raise their kids — or at least play some Nintendo.

> Read the full article on the Financial Times website

By Simon Kuper

Source: Financial Times

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