Sector News

Seattle Genetics on a ‘great trajectory,’ looks to grow staff by 100

April 24, 2015
Life sciences
Seattle Genetics is hiring for 100 positions, Chief Operating Officer Eric Dobmeier said Thursday.
 
The Bothell-based biotech company (Nasdaq: SGEN) is looking to fill positions ranging from biostatisticians and research associates to the head of its cancer research program and vice president of marketing.
 
That growth is to keep the company, which develops cancer treatments, on track with what a Seattle Genetics spokeswoman called a “great trajectory.”
 
Hiring new people will also coincide with the company ramping up spending in coming years to support preclinical developments, clinical trial activities and continue the commercialization of its flagship product Adcetris, according to a recent filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Adcetris is used to treat lymphoma.
 
Seattle Genetics is also investing heavily in its pipeline. That was one factor that led to a $27 million loss in the fourth quarter last year.
 
Even after that loss, though, the company’s stock held steady. Today it is trading at about $37 per share.
 
The company will report first quarter earnings next week.
 
By Annie Zak
 

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