Sector News

Sanofi to add 350 jobs at shared services site in Hungary

October 4, 2019
Life sciences

Sanofi may be trimming its headcount in Japan through voluntary retirements, but the drugmaker is adding jobs in Hungary. The company plans to open a shared services center in Budapest and employ 350 people there.

The site will start with 100 workers and provide business support services such as accounting, finance and human resources in seven languages, according to a press release (PDF). Sanofi currently employs more than 2,000 people in Hungary at three manufacturing plants, a logistics site and a global strategic unit. The company plans to grow employment to 350 by 2022.

The news comes right on the heels of Sanofi’s confirmation that it’s trimming jobs in Japan through voluntary early retirements, although the drugmaker didn’t confirm a target number of job cuts. Citing a source, Reuters reported the company wants to reduce its headcount by 200 employees in the country.

It also comes amid CEO Paul Hudson’s “listening tour,” during which he’s working to learn as much as he can about the company by visiting numerous sites and countries. Hudson joined from Novartis last month and hasn’t yet talked about future strategies, but he plans to have a presentation ready for an investor event in December.

Before the Japan retirement confirmation, Sanofi in June said it would cut 466 jobs in its R&D group in France and Germany. In April, the company said it would lay off an undisclosed number of U.S. sales staffers.

Meanwhile, the company is weighing strategic options in Bangladesh, a spokesman confirmed. Local reports have said the company intends to sell its share and exit the country, creating uncertainty for 1,000 workers.

Sanofi operates in more than 100 countries and employed 104,266 workers at the end of the year, down slightly from 106,566 at the end of 2017 and 106,859 at the end of 2016.

By Eric Sagonowsky

Source: Fierce Pharma

comments closed

Related News

December 5, 2021

Catherine Mazzacco is leaving the position as President and CEO of LEO Pharma

Life sciences

After more than two years of leading LEO Pharma through a major transformation and a change of capital structure in a volatile environment during the global pandemic, the Board of Directors of LEO Pharma and President and CEO Catherine Mazzacco have jointly agreed that she will resign from her current role and leave the company on November 30, 2021.

December 5, 2021

Lonza and Bioqube Ventures to scale biologics and small molecules

Life sciences

Lonza and Bioqube Ventures, a European venture capital firm with a dual investment model including venture creation, have partnered to develop and manufacture biologics and small molecules. This is a five-year services agreement in which Lonza will provide advice and services to Bioqube Ventures’ portfolio companies.

December 5, 2021

UCB and Chiesi enter global license agreement for zampilimab a novel monoclonal antibody for fibrotic lung diseases

Life sciences

UCB has granted to Chiesi global exclusive rights to develop, manufacture and commercialize zampilimab, a monoclonal antibody targeting transglutaminase 2 (TG2), an enzyme associated in fibrotic diseases. UCB will receive upfront payment, future milestone payments and net sales royalties.

Send this to a friend