Sector News

Novo Nordisk remains on hunt for biopharma deals

January 30, 2018
Life sciences

Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk will continue to hunt for promising assets to refill its blood products business, after losing out to Sanofi in a $4.8 billion fight for Belgian biotech company Ablynx.

“We are currently active on a couple of initiatives that hopefully will succeed and enable us to bolt activities on to our biopharma franchise in 2018,” Chief Financial Officer Jesper Brandgaard told Reuters.

France’s Sanofi won Ablynx and its prized experimental bleeding disorder drug caplacizumab with a 50 percent-higher bid than an previously rejected offer from Novo Nordisk.

Brandgaard said his company could not have justified the price Sanofi was paying but he remained hopeful of finding other new medicines in development at rival biotech companies.

“It’s important for Novo Nordisk shareholders that we stay disciplined on the use of cash in the company,” he said.

The Danish group is best known as the world’s biggest insulin maker. While it enjoys good growth in its diabetes and obesity business, which accounts for around 80 percent of sales, the biopharmaceuticals division, which makes up nearly 20 percent of revenue led by hemophilia, is slowing.

It stands to lose sales particularly because of new competition from Roche’s hemophilia drug Hemlibra.

“We remain focused on identifying additional assets in the hemophilia and hematology space that we can bolt on to our existing franchise,” Brandgaard said.

“We believe those assets are available but whether it is going to be in the form of in-licensing of Phase II or Phase III clinical stage assets or whether it is going to be outright M&A, that depends.”

Novo Nordisk is showing a new eagerness to engage in acquisitions under Chief Executive Lars Fruergaard Jorgensen, who took over a year ago, and who has said the firm needs external innovation to broaden its product line-up.

It has the firepower to do deals, with strong cash flows and a cash pile of 19 billion Danish crowns at the end of September 2017, although analysts believe it might have to trim share buybacks in 2018 in the event of a substantial purchase.

So far the Danish company has failed to successfully execute a big deal.

In addition to losing Ablynx, in March 2017 it also approached Global Blood Therapeutics, a U.S. biotech company focused on serious blood disorders, to discuss a potential takeover, people familiar with the situation said at the time.

Brandgaard said Novo Nordisk had not made a formal attempt to buy Global Blood Therapeutics and described reports of its interest in the U.S. firm as a market rumor.

By Ben Hirschler

Source: Reuters

comments closed

Related News

January 15, 2022

Colorcon Ventures invests in AI-Driven bio-simulation company VeriSIM Life

Life sciences

Colorcon Ventures, the corporate venture fund of Colorcon Inc., has invested in VeriSIM Life, a San Francisco-based startup with a digital bio-simulation platform that accelerates drug development and reduces animal testing.

January 15, 2022

A record number of biotechs are going public. Here’s how they’re performing.

Life sciences

Initial public offerings have fueled biotech’s boom. Keep track of them as they happen with this database. Which biotechs create value over time, and which fail? What types of companies are generating the best returns? Who are their top investors? Biopharma Dive is tracking these details in the database which will be updated regularly.

January 15, 2022

Sanofi cuts ties with Sangamo, sharpening focus on ‘off-the-shelf’ cell therapy

Life sciences

Sanofi has ended a long-running alliance with Sangamo Therapeutics to develop genetic medicines for inherited blood disorders, among them an experimental sickle cell disease therapy that is in early clinical testing.
The two have been developing complex, personalized treatments, led by a sickle cell drug known as SAR445136. But Sanofi is now more interested in off-the-shelf approaches, which are meant to be more convenient.

Send this to a friend