Sector News

New frontiers

October 25, 2019
Life sciences

Increasing advancements in digital technology has provided pharmaceutical industry stakeholders with new innovations that have the potential to accelerate drug discovery, research and development.

Some of these, such as the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) – connected devices used within the medical and healthcare industries – will further revolutionise the efficiency of trials, while increasing clinical care outcomes.

This article explores how the IoMT can reduce burden on patients, while increasing clinical development programme efficiency to ultimately improve patient care.

How IoMT supports patients in clinical trials

For trial success, not only do the right patients need to be selected, but they also need to feel supported throughout the entire clinical trial.

Patients often have difficulty finding clinical trials, and later enrolment and participation can bring additional burdens. Using technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and predictive analytics can reveal patients most suitable for trials. From the moment a patient is entered into an electronic medical record (EMR), they then can easily be connected and matched to clinical trials through health databases. The IoMT, such as electronic informed consent, can make joining and participating in clinical trials easier and more convenient for patients.

Once enrolled in a trial, data collected from IoMT – including at-home digital monitoring and virtual visits – can create a personalised trial participation experience, driving better patient adherence and retention. Wearable monitors and apps incorporated into a clinical trial can provide continuous monitoring, making a trial safer and reducing site visits. Having an online support network can provide quality interaction between the trial participants and sites, thus mitigating any issues as they arise.

Additionally, data acquired from IoMT can help develop more detailed patient profiles for future trials, accelerating recruitment and reducing start-up costs, in addition to informing insights on patient demographics, speeding commercialisation.

How IoMT leads to better trial outcomes

IoMT can also help to refine and strengthen study designs. EMR data can help clinical trial designers develop protocols that meet patient needs, easing recruitment and decreasing the chance of amendments, potentially shortening timelines.

Further, IoMT can be used to develop digital endpoints. Quantifying disease improvement by measuring physical parameters, offers a greater chance of trial success. For example, the six-minute walking test is widely used in respiratory drug trials as a regulatory endpoint. Automated monitoring and real-world evidence data collection can also support trial safety, early decision-making and adaptive changes, therefore improving efficiency and accelerating development.

The integration of IoMT in drug development can yield valuable insights towards a better understanding of the disease pathology in a real-world environment, in addition to supporting and streamlining regulatory approvals.

The future: digital pharma for the patient-centric trial

For IoMT to make the greatest impact on drug development, this new frontier will need engagement from industry stakeholders. Already, there are several initiatives launched that aim to promote and streamline adoption of IoMT in drug development. As sponsors embrace the IoMT and apply it to their clinical trial strategy, working with a strategic partner with experience in implementing these technologies can set up a trial for success from the start, rather than adding it on as an afterthought.

By Tom O’Leary

Source: Pharma Times

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

Rise of the machines: Novo Nordisk pledges $200M to create first quantum computer for life sciences

Life sciences

Big Pharma has long seen the potential for AI and machine learning to accelerate drug development. But Novo Nordisk is going a step further by channeling $200 million toward the creation of a computer that will outrun anything in existence.

September 25, 2022

Mount Sinai AI uncovers new brain analysis method to predict dementia, Alzheimer’s disease

Life sciences

Current methods for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease rely on a complex combination of self- and caregiver-reported symptoms, a physical examination and either a PET scan or a spinal tap to look for evidence of amyloid plaque build-ups in the brain. But a new artificial intelligence-based method may make the diagnostic process a much more objective one.

September 25, 2022

New AstraZeneca-backed report finds big money behind diverse owners and entrepreneurs in Europe

Life sciences

There is lots of talk about diversity and inclusion in business, including in pharma and medtech. A new report by the Open Political Economy Network (OPEN), a think tank focusing on migration and diversity, released its “Minority Businesses Matter: Europe” report highlighting the successes and challenges of ethnic minority-owned businesses in Europe.