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Mylan says Teva’s stake buy violates U.S. anti-trust rules

June 2, 2015
Life sciences
(Reuters) – Mylan NV said Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd , which has made an unsolicited offer for the company, violated U.S. anti-trust rules by acquiring a stake.
 
Teva disclosed a 1.35 percent stake in Mylan last week.
 
“We consider Teva’s stakebuilding as a further indication of its intention to meddle with our business, strategy and mission while remaining unclear as to its actual intentions,” Mylan said in a letter addressed to Teva’s chief executive, Erez Vigodman.(http://1.usa.gov/1Q0SxgC)
 
Mylan did not clarify which anti-trust rule Teva violated.
 
The two companies were not immediately available for comment.
 
Mylan said on Monday there was still no clarity whether Teva would make a formal offer, almost six weeks since Teva’s offer for about $40 billion.
 
(Reporting by Anjali Rao Koppala in Bengaluru; Editing by Maju Samuel)
 

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