Sector News

Johnson & Johnson to cut about 3000 jobs from medical devices business

January 19, 2016
Life sciences

Johnson & Johnson announced Tuesday that under a restructuring of its medical devices unit, it will cut approximately 4 percent to 6 percent of the segment’s global workforce over the next two years, representing around 3000 positions.

The company noted that the actions, which are expected to lead to cost savings of between $800 million and $1 billion, will affect its orthopaedics, surgery and cardiovascular units, while the consumer medical devices, vision care and diabetes care businesses will not be impacted.

According to Johnson & Johnson, the restructuring is designed “to strengthen its go-to-market model, accelerate the pace of innovation, further prioritise key platforms and geographies, and streamline operations.” Gary Pruden, worldwide chairman of Johnson & Johnson’s medical devices unit, remarked that “the bold steps we are taking today are to evolve our offerings, structure and footprint and increase our investment in innovation.” He added “these actions recognise the changing needs of the global medical device market.”

The company said it expects to cut about $200 million in costs this year as a result of the move, with most of the anticipated savings to be realised by the end of 2018, providing the company with “added flexibility and resources to fund investment in new growth opportunities and innovative solutions.” Johnson & Johnson also said it would book restructuring charges of around $2 billion to $2.4 billion, of which roughly $600 million will be recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015.

Meanwhile, Johnson & Johnson confirmed its previous guidance for full-year 2015 earnings per share of $6.15 to $6.20, which excludes special items such as restructuring charges, with overall sales of between $70 billion and $71 billion. The company also noted that it will use a new format to report sales in the medical devices segment when it releases its fourth-quarter earnings on January 26.

By Katie Bell

Source: First Word Medtech

Join the discussion!

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related News

November 27, 2020

AbbVie lifts insider Jeffrey Stewart to commercial chief as company veteran Carlos Alban retires

Life sciences

AbbVie will soon have a new chief commercial officer, who’ll assume the heavy responsibility of navigating the Illinois pharma’s marketing transition from megablockbuster Humira.

November 27, 2020

Belgium biotech argenx nabs Bayer speedy review voucher for a cool $98M

Life sciences

The biotech, which has a series of deals across Big Pharma, will use the voucher, which can speed up the regulatory process for a new drug, for its late-stage drug efgartigimod—but not in the indication you might think.

November 27, 2020

Galapagos sells off Fidelta as CRO activities ‘no longer fit with its strategy’

Life sciences

Galapagos is selling off its contract research organization Fidelta for $37 million to Polish life science company Selvita. Fidelta focuses on inflammation, fibrosis and anti-infectives, with 181 employees at the helm.

Send this to a friend