Sector News

J&J completes acquisition of Alios Biopharma

November 12, 2014
Life sciences
Johnson & Johnson (J&J) announced the completion of the acquisition of Alios BioPharma, Inc., a privately held clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing therapies for viral diseases, for a total purchase price of approximately $1.75 billion in cash.
 
With this acquisition complete, Alios BioPharma will now become part of the infectious diseases therapeutic area of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson.  The acquisition includes Alios BioPharma’s portfolio of potential therapeutics for viral infections with the promising compound AL-8176, an orally administered antiviral therapy currently in phase 2 studies for the treatment of infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).  RSV is the last of the major paediatric diseases that currently has no effective therapy.  The acquisition also includes two early-stage compounds for hepatitis C (HCV) that could potentially augment Janssen’s existing HCV portfolio.
 
“The acquisition of Alios BioPharma further reflects our commitment to bringing together the best science from around the globe to address significant unmet need.   Together we will further strengthen Janssen’s infectious diseases pipeline to address the needs of patients and families affected by some of the world’s most devastating diseases,” said Paul Stoffels, M.D., chief scientific officer of Johnson & Johnson and Worldwide chairman, pharmaceuticals.
 
Source: pharmabiz

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