Sector News

GSK and IDEAYA partner in synthetic lethality

June 18, 2020
Life sciences

GlaxoSmithKline and IDEAYA Biosciences have announced a strategic partnership in synthetic lethality, an emerging arm of oncology and a core research focus for GSK.

In synthetic lethality, cells can cope with the loss of single genes in isolation but a combination of deficiencies in two or more genes leads to cell death. When tumour suppressor genes are functionally lost in cancer, this mode of action can be used to exploit tumour-specific vulnerabilities through new medicines for patients with cancer.

The partnership includes IDEAYA’s synthetic lethality programs MAT2A, Pol Theta, and Werner Helicase programmes, which should reach clinical trials within the next three years.

IDEAYA has solved the crystal structures for each these programmes, facilitating structure-based drug design, and has demonstrated in vivo proof of concept in relevant animal models for its MAT2A and Pol Theta programmes.

“GSK is the ideal strategic partner for IDEAYA, as this partnership enables compelling potential combinations and the opportunity to build the industry leading synthetic lethality pipeline that targets molecularly defined populations in several major solid tumours, including potentially lung, prostate, breast, colorectal, and ovarian cancer,” said Yujiro S. Hata, the firm’s chief executive and president.

Under the terms of the partnership, IDEAYA will lead the MAT2A programme through early clinical development and is responsible for all costs prior to the GSK option exercise, after which it is responsible for 20% of global development costs.

In return, IDEAYA will receive a 50% US profit share and ex-US royalties for the MAT2A and Werner Helicase programmes and is responsible for 20% of global development costs for licensed products being developed with GSK.

The group also stands to bank global royalties for the Pol Theta programme, and GSK will cover all research, development, and commercialisation costs.

GSK is responsible for all commercialisation activities and costs globally for licensed products.

By: Selina McKee

Source: Pharma Times

comments closed

Related News

May 21, 2022

As monkeypox cases emerge in US and Europe, Bavarian Nordic inks vaccine order

Life sciences

A monkeypox outbreak is emerging in the U.S. and Europe, and at least one country is amping up countermeasure preparedness. Bavarian Nordic has secured a contract with an unnamed European country to supply its smallpox vaccine, called Imvanex in Europe, in response to the emergence of monkeypox cases, the Danish company said Thursday.

May 21, 2022

Moderna chairman Afeyan defends hiring practices after CFO debacle: report

Life sciences

Moderna’s recent chief financial officer debacle—in which Jorge Gomez departed on his second day on the job—raised questions about the company’s hiring process given its rush to global biopharma prominence. The most obvious one: How was it possible for Gomez to be hired when he was under investigation by his previous employer, Dentsply Sirona of Charlotte, N.C.

May 21, 2022

Merck to pay up to $1.4B in cancer deal with Kelun, but details are scarce

Life sciences

Merck & Co. is plucking a cancer project from the branch of Chinese-based Kelun Pharmaceutical for up to $1.4 billion, but details from the New Jersey-based Big Pharma have been hard to come by. The deal, first disclosed Monday on the Shenzhen stock exchange, has Merck handing over $47 million in upfront cash in exchange for ex-China rights to a “macromolecular tumor project.”