Sector News

Goodbye pill, hello science: Pfizer debuts redesigned logo with double helix

January 10, 2021
Life sciences

Pfizer’s got a new blue. Two new blues in fact, with the company’s rebrand and new logo design. Gone is the staid blue oval pill background, replaced by a two-tone blue double helix spiral.

It’s the first significant visual redesign for Pfizer in 70 years since the company began using the blue oval background. The tagline outlining Pfizer’s purpose, “Breakthroughs that change patients’ lives,” remains the same.

The new logo signals Pfizer’s “shift from commerce to science. We’ve unlocked the pill form to reveal the core of what we do,” Pfizer explains on its website.

Along with the redesign, Pfizer debuted two new video ads—one explaining the new logo and another that continues its “Science Will Win” campaign, begun in April. The second video features modern-day and historical images of scientists with bold letter proclamations and complementary voiceover statements, such as, “We believe science can cure every human disease—and we’re going all in.”

“Our new identity reflects the dignity of Pfizer’s history and captures the innovative spirit and science focus alive in the company today,” Sally Susman, executive VP and chief corporate affairs officer, said on the new Pfizer website.

CEO Albert Bourla added, “Pfizer is no longer in the business of just treating diseases—we’re curing and preventing them.”

The new logo is a result of 18 months of work, a Pfizer spokesperson said, in an email. That includes a pause on the creative work for several months beginning in March “as the company became laser-focused on the development of a COVID-19 vaccine.”

The process included surveying patients and doctors globally, as well as narrowing 200 designs down to four before selecting the eventual winner, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal.

The rebrand comes as Pfizer rides a reputation wave of good news, begun after it and partner BioNTech first announced positive COVID-19 vaccine data in November. Reports of the vaccine’s 95% effectiveness rate boosted Pfizer’s image with more than 48% of Americans who heard about it, agreeing it gave them a more positive view of the drugmaker.

by Beth Snyder Bulik

Source: fiercepharma.com

Join the discussion!

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related News

January 10, 2021

Merck to acquire German contract development company AmpTec

Life sciences

The deal will enhance Merck’s expertise in developing and manufacturing mRNA for its customers for use in vaccines, treatments and diagnostics applicable in Covid-19 and various other diseases.

January 10, 2021

Fujifilm triples down on viral vector manufacturing with new $40M Boston site

Life sciences

The massive growth of gene therapy research and development over the last few years has boosted demand for viral vectors, the engineered viruses used to deliver therapeutic genes into patients’ bodies. Tokyo-based Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies is stepping up to meet that demand.

January 10, 2021

BioNTech CEO applies COVID-19 vaccine’s mRNA tech to multiple sclerosis

Life sciences

The new vaccine technology mRNA is making waves these days as COVID-19 shots based on it deliver efficacy that’s unrivaled by other platforms. Now BioNTech’s CEO, Ugur Sahin, M.D., Ph.D., has led new research showing that an mRNA vaccine might also work in multiple sclerosis (MS).

Send this to a friend