Sector News

Covid-19 is teaching hard lessons about China-only supply chains

March 2, 2020
Life sciences

Until about the third week of January, only a few pharmaceutical executives, drug-safety inspectors and dogged China hawks cared that a large share of the world’s supply of antibiotics depends on a handful of Chinese factories.

These include a cluster in Inner Mongolia, a northern province of windswept deserts, grasslands and unlovely industrial towns. Then came the covid-19 outbreak, and quarantine controls that locked down factories, ports and whole cities across China.

Chinese leaders insist that they are well on the way to conquering the virus, allowing them to reopen “leading enterprises and key links with important influence” in global supply chains. A victory over the novel coronavirus will once again demonstrate “the notable advantages of leadership by the Communist Party of China”, President Xi Jinping told 170,000 officials by video-conference on February 23rd. But even if all those boasts come true, foreign governments and business bosses will not quickly forget a frightening lesson: for some vital products, they depend on one country.

> Read the full article on The Economist website

Source: The Economist

comments closed

Related News

July 3, 2022

Novo Nordisk joins with nursing group to highlight correlation between Type 2 diabetes and cardio risk

Life sciences

Despite atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) being the leading cause of death for people with Type 2 diabetes, half of those people have no idea of this risk. Novo Nordisk has teamed up with the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association (PCNA) for “Making the Connection,” a program to help increase understanding of the link between the two diseases.

July 3, 2022

First treatment for ‘broken heart syndrome’ trialled

Life sciences

The first ever treatment for broken heart syndrome – also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy – is to be trialled by researchers at the University of Aberdeen. Scientists will trial a programme of exercise conditioning and psychological therapy for people who have been diagnosed with the condition following a £300,000 grant from the British Heart Foundation.

July 3, 2022

Nestlé acquiring The Better Health Company in market expansion deal

Life sciences

Nestlé Health Science is set to acquire The Better Health Company (TBHC), as part of its goals to grow global market share while spurring innovation across the nutrition industry. The acquisition includes the GO Healthy brand with its vitamins and supplements, Egmont, the Manuka honey brand and New Zealand Health Manufacturing, an Auckland-based manufacturing facility for vitamins minerals and supplements.