Sector News

TreeHouse Foods taps Hershey vet as chief strategy officer

September 9, 2019
Food & Drink

Amit Philip has been named senior vice-president and chief strategy officer of TreeHouse Foods, Inc.

Mr. Philip joins TreeHouse from The Hershey Co., where he spent seven years in positions of increasing responsibility within the corporate strategy and analytics functions. Most recently, he was vice-president of analytics and insights for the company and before that was senior director of business decision analytics. He joined Hershey in 2011 as a director and senior manager of corporate strategy and was promoted to director of North America strategy in 2013.

Prior to his time at Hershey, Mr. Philip was a manager and associate at A.T. Kearney. He began his career in 2000 as a junior consultant at Schlumberger, Ltd., an oilfield services company. During his five years with the company, Mr. Philip advanced to a technical consultant and then to a senior consultant.

“I’m delighted to welcome Amit to TreeHouse,” said Steven T. Oakland, chief executive officer and president of TreeHouse Foods. “His experience providing holistic business intelligence, ensuring data driven decision making and leading strategy functions to develop growth plans in a rapidly changing marketplace will be instrumental as we position our portfolio for the future.”

By Rebekah Schouten

Source: Food Business News

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