Sector News

Bright Blue Foods acquires Greencore’s UK cakes business

January 29, 2018
Food & Drink

UK-based bakery organisation Bright Blue Foods (BBF) has announced it will acquire Greencore’s UK cakes and desserts business in Hull.

Greencore has also announced it will be closing its facility in Evercreech, Somerset, meaning the company will no longer operate within the UK’s cakes and desserts sector.

BBF estimates that the facility’s transition should be completed by mid-February 2018, following a consultation process with the facility’s current employees.

The Hull site will join BBF’s network of bakeries, which includes facilities in Bradford, Blackburn, Shadworth and in Szczecin, Poland.

Jonathan Lill, CEO of BBF said: “This is a really exciting time for our company, our people and our customers. The product range and customer base from both businesses are very complementary.

“BBF is entirely focussed on the bakery sector and this acquisition will be transformational for our business. We are committed to continuing to invest in the category and deliver great quality, service and innovation to our customers.”

Source: FoodBev

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