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Women hold fewer than 5% of CEO positions in US and Europe

December 11, 2018
Diversity & Inclusion

Women still account for fewer than 5 per cent of the chief executive positions in the US, UK and Europe, according to new research that suggests efforts to diversify corporate leadership may be stalling.

The study by Heidrick & Struggles, an executive search firm, found that women held 4.9 per cent of the top roles across 13 countries, with female representation in the chief executive position ranging from 6.9 per cent in the US to zero in Denmark and Italy.

In some countries, the percentage has fallen in the past year. In the UK, the number of women holding FTSE 100 chief executive positions has slipped from seven to six, just below the number of CEOs named Dave or David. The number of FTSE 350 chief executives dropped from 15 to 12.

> Read the full article on the Financial Times website

By Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson

Source: Financial Times

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