Sector News

Women hold fewer than 5% of CEO positions in US and Europe

December 11, 2018
Diversity & Inclusion

Women still account for fewer than 5 per cent of the chief executive positions in the US, UK and Europe, according to new research that suggests efforts to diversify corporate leadership may be stalling.

The study by Heidrick & Struggles, an executive search firm, found that women held 4.9 per cent of the top roles across 13 countries, with female representation in the chief executive position ranging from 6.9 per cent in the US to zero in Denmark and Italy.

In some countries, the percentage has fallen in the past year. In the UK, the number of women holding FTSE 100 chief executive positions has slipped from seven to six, just below the number of CEOs named Dave or David. The number of FTSE 350 chief executives dropped from 15 to 12.

> Read the full article on the Financial Times website

By Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson

Source: Financial Times

Related News

April 17, 2021

Even the staunchest defenders of equality will discriminate against older workers

Diversity & Inclusion

The study finds that around one in five workers over 40 have experienced age-related discrimination in some way at work, with this rising to 24% of those over 60 years of age. This wasn’t confined to explicit discrimination, as jokes and harassment related to age were also sadly commonplace.

April 10, 2021

Research: Adding women to the C-Suite changes how companies think

Diversity & Inclusion

It’s well known that firms with greater gender diversity among senior leadership perform better. But what’s less clear is why exactly that is. In this piece, the authors share new research that explores exactly how the addition of female executives shifts companies’ strategic approach to innovation.

March 27, 2021

Paternity leave helps women, men and businesses—but its adoption isn’t equitable

Diversity & Inclusion

Equitable parental leave has the potential to reduce gender inequality in the workplace, but most sectors of the U.S. economy have been slow to adopt.

Send this to a friend