Sector News

How technology is disrupting the foodservice sector

September 26, 2018
Consumer Packaged Goods

Health and wellness is a priority for the majority of consumers, but how can healthier choices be made when managing a hectic lifestyle? More apps such as Nutrifix are appearing which claim to offer solutions to this. We spoke to Joel Burgess, founder of Nutrifix.

The app simplifies the information about certain menu options in the foodservice industry, going beyond calorie counts into a more holistic, personalised view of eating on the go.

This technology holds potential knock-on effects for chain restaurants to offer their nutritional information more freely, something which is looking more likely as many restaurants currently offer calorie counts with their menus.

The demand for personalised nutrition with clearer labelling comes with an increase in public knowledge and scientific advancements.

Burgess said: “The growth in the wellness sector at the moment is enormous, and there is far more awareness about how different everyone’s bodies are – the same diets and exercises don’t work for everyone.

“As new genes are discovered, technology will be able to leverage these improvements to provide an optimum nutrition plan.”

Health and wellness apps could impact the way consumers perceive nutritional information in the future. This transparency could influence the foodservice sectors in terms of ingredient selection and the disclosure of nutritional information.

Burgess is well aware of this. He went on to say: “People should be aware of what’s in their food and encouraging people to think about this can only be a positive thing, especially when there’s still freedom to interpret this information depending on how you feel! We’re not dictating any rules, just raising awareness and providing transparency.”

“People should be aware of what’s in their food,” Burgess says.

The use of apps can give consumers a simplified way to access personalised nutrition, which can serve as an instant way for consumers to alter their diets accordingly.

Burgess went on to detail how technology is influencing the way consumers view and interpret health and wellness.

“New technologies are set to revolutionise the health of the average person. Most people can’t afford a personal trainer and/or nutritionist and rely on channels like Instagram, YouTube or podcasts to learn about living healthily. This leaves them vulnerable to misinformation, but with improvements to technology, tracking and the latest science popping up left, right and centre, high-quality nutritional knowledge will become accessible and actionable for everyone – no big bills, hours of planning or degree necessary.”

By Harriet Jachec

Source: FoodBev

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