Sector News

US INVISTA to close adipic acid plant in Texas

October 7, 2015
Energy & Chemical Value Chain

(ICIS) – INVISTA is shutting down its adipic acid plant in Orange, Texas, as part of restructuring efforts at the site, the US nylon 6,6 and intermediates producer confirmed on Tuesday.

“The decision to shut down the adipic acid unit was driven by lower adipic acid demand in North America and increased supply in the global adipic acid market,” said Bill Greenfield, president of INVISTA Intermediates.

INVISTA said the restructuring of the site is so it “can more rapidly respond to the ever-changing global marketplace that it serves”, and this will result in a workforce reduction of 75 or more employees at the site.

The company will continue to produce adipic acid at its Victoria site in Texas, and representatives are communicating with customers on specific impacts that this could have on their supply.

INVISTA said it recently invested more than $100m at its Orange site to install and commercialise the company’s proprietary adiponitrile (ADN) technology, which was implemented at the site last year.

Adipic acid is produced from benzene via cyclohexane (CX) or phenol. Adipic acid’s main use is in the production of nylon 6,6 by combining it with hexamethylenediamine (HMD or HMDA), which is made from ADN via butadiene (BD) or propylene.

INVISTA’s adipic acid plant in Orange has a capacity of 220,000 tonnes/year, according to ICIS plants and projects.

By Tracy Dang

Source: ICIS News

comments closed

Related News

February 25, 2024

Antwerp Declaration for a European Industrial Deal: industry leaders call for 10 urgent actions to restore competitiveness and keep good jobs in Europe

Energy & Chemical Value Chain

During a European Industry Summit held on the site of BASF in Antwerp, leaders from basic industry sectors, representing 7.8 million workers in Europe, joined forces with European trade unions and European leaders to address pressing concerns regarding Europe’s industrial landscape.

February 25, 2024

Blue hydrogen could contribute 50% more to global warming than fossil fuels

Energy & Chemical Value Chain

The use of blue or low-carbon hydrogen, made from natural gas with carbon capture and storage (CCS), could increase near-term global warming by 50% compared with burning fossil fuels directly for energy if emissions are not properly managed, according to a new study by NGO the US Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and the University of Arizona.

February 25, 2024

EU approves €6.9 Billion state aid for 33 hydrogen projects

Energy & Chemical Value Chain

In a move to improve the supply of renewable hydrogen and thus reduce dependence on natural gas and contribute to achieving the objectives of the European Green Deal and the REPowerEU plan, the EU Commission has approved a third Important project of common European interest (IPCEI) to support hydrogen infrastructure.

How can we help you?

We're easy to reach