Sector News

Scotland launches green jobs advice service

August 29, 2021
Chemical Value Chain

The Scottish Government has launched a workforce academy with the aim of offering advice to workers preparing to transition to green jobs.

The Green Jobs Workforce Academy aims to ensure that Scotland’s workforce has the required skills to meet the country’s target of net zero by 2045. It has been developed by Skills Development Scotland (SDS) on behalf of the Scottish Government. Establishing the academy was one of the key aims of the SDS from its Climate Emergency Skills Action Plan which was published in December last year.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said: “As we recover from the pandemic we are determined to build a fairer economy that delivers the skills, opportunities and jobs for the future that will help secure our transition to net-zero and end our contribution to climate change.

“The launch of our Green Jobs Workforce Academy is an invaluable step in preparing our current and future workforce to seize the opportunities afforded to us as part of that just transition. The academy will guide people of all ages through a process of identifying the skills they have and the skills they will need to find and secure green jobs.”

The academy will offer information on available opportunities and the skills needed to avail of these,, along with details on required training and funding sources. It will also have in-depth information available on the green jobs sectors including renewables, transportation, construction, engineering, agriculture and land use.

Frank Mitchell, Chair of Skills Development Scotland, said: “There are already opportunities across a number of Scotland’s key economic sectors offering great career prospects for people with the right skills. The Green Jobs Workforce Academy will make it easier for people from a broad range of backgrounds to consider how their skills and experience can be built upon to launch a green career.”

Claire Mack, CEO of Scottish Renewables, said: “Putting people at the heart of the energy transition will not only enable our current workers to maintain and add to their skills to ensure they have a sustainable career path, it also means that Scotland will continue to develop a world class low carbon labour market with skills that will be in demand across the globe as other countries follow in Scotland’s footsteps to decarbonise their electricity, transport and heating energy demand.”

Separately, The Financial Times has reported that in an unlikely alliance, Greenpeace are campaigning for a transferrable “offshore skills passport” to help oil and gas workers to transition to green jobs. The activist group has been calling at ports in Scotland and north-east England with their vessel the Rainbow Warrior to campaign for a just transition for North Sea oil and gas workers.

by Amanda Doyle

Source: thechemicalengineer.com

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