Sector News

Saft signs multi-million dollar contract with Lockheed Martin

October 26, 2015
Chemical Value Chain

Saft has been awarded a multi-million dollar Long Term Agreement (LTA) with Lockheed Martin as the preferred supplier of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries for the company’s telecommunications satellites.

The follow-on five-year contract – signed through 2020 – validates the continued partnership between Saft and Lockheed Martin for Li-ion cells for satellites that have been proven to work reliably under the harsh space conditions. Saft will supply high-energy VL48E Li-ion cells with a 3.6V, 48Ah package to power the satellites with light-weight, reliable technology necessary to withstand a demanding space lifecycle.

“For nearly half a century, Saft has played a significant role in providing high performance batteries to the space market, and we are thrilled to have the opportunity to further our relationship with Lockheed Martin,” said Thomas Alcide, President of Saft America, Inc. and General Manager of Saft’s Specialty Battery Group. “Our innovative thinking and advanced technology solutions have led us to become the top supplier worldwide of batteries for satellites as we continue to pursue a mission of powering outer space.”

For Saft, this contract demonstrates a proven – and growing – heritage as a technology leader within the space market.

Source: Saft

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