Sector News

Novozymes acquires Pacific Vet Group-USA, Inc.

October 5, 2015
Chemical Value Chain

Novozymes today announced the acquisition of Pacific Vet Group-USA, Inc. (PVG) for an undisclosed fee.

Based in Arkansas, U.S., PVG develops and produces probiotics for animals. The company has significant know-how in probiotic applications for poultry, strong development expertise, a pipeline for the poultry hatchery segment and a smaller commercial product portfolio.

“PVG is a great fit with Novozymes as we continue to build our position as the leading innovation partner in probiotics for animals,” says Helle Warrer Poulsen, Vice President, Animal Health & Nutrition at Novozymes. “With PVG we will get access to a promising pipeline and early product concepts targeted at the hatchery segment in the U.S. The PVG team has strong ties to academia and industry, and brings experience in the development of probiotics for animals. They will provide Novozymes with valuable insights and expertise, and further strengthen our partnerships.”

Beneficial bacteria to reduce antibiotics
PVG has 23 employees, primarily in research and application development. The company is based in Fayetteville, Arkansas, and was founded in 2008 around technology developed by the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture. Its current products are primarily sold in the U.S. The products are based on beneficial bacteria – mainly lactic acid bacteria – and work to improve gut health in poultry.

Probiotics are naturally occurring, live microbes that improve the gut flora of pigs, poultry and other animals. They improve health, food safety, animal growth and feed utilization, thereby providing a natural alternative to antibiotic growth promoters.

Novozymes first entered the probiotics-for-animals business in May 2015, when it announced a product development partnership with Adisseo.

The acquisition is not expected to impact Novozymes’ financial outlook for 2015.

Source: Novozymes

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