Sector News

Linde AG to sign major Russian order: sources

May 30, 2017
Chemical Value Chain

German industrial gases group Linde AG is about to receive a major order from a Russian company, two people familiar with the deal told Reuters on Monday.

The order for Linde’s engineering unit comes from a company from the republic of Tatarstan and will be signed on Friday at the St. Petersburg economic forum, the sources said.

German newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung reported on Monday that the deal was worth about 1 billion euros ($1.12 billion).

A Linde spokesman declined to comment.

Linde said last week that it had reached a deal in principle with peer Praxair on a Business Combination Agreement for a proposed $70 billion merger.

By Joern Poltz

Source: Reuters

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