Sector News

K+S: Change in Management

August 21, 2015
Chemical Value Chain
The Supervisory Board of K+S KALI GmbH, Kassel, has appointed Dr. Rainer Gerling to the executive management of the Company with effect from 1 January 2016. Dr. Gerling (56) will succeed Dr. Ralf Diekmann, who will retire on 31 December 2015 after 34 years of service with the K+S Group. The Supervisory Board would like to thank Dr. Diekmann for his many years of dedicated service, particularly in recognition of his specialist knowledge in developing production sites and optimizing processes so that potash production can be conducted in a way that conserves the environment.
 
Dr. Gerling will assume responsibility for production and technology. His term of office will run until 31 December 2018. Dr. Gerling currently heads the Werra potash plant, where his work primarily involves matters relating to the environment, approval procedures and occupational safety. He has worked for the K+S Group since 1985 and possesses extensive experience gained by working in several K+S plants in Lower Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Hesse, where he was responsible for mining technology as well as underground production/technology.
 
Source: About K+S KALI GmbH

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?