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Johnson Matthey signs supply agreement with US biopharmaceutical firm

September 8, 2020
Chemical Value Chain

Johnson Matthey (JM; London, UK) says it has entered into a five-year supply agreement with Sarepta Therapeutics (Andover, Massachusetts), a biopharmaceutical company.

According to the terms of the agreement, JM will continue to provide regulatory starting materials to support Sarepta’s programs for phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) and peptide phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PPMO), used for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the company says.

JM’s innovator products and solutions business that provides custom development and manufacturing (CDMO) services will produce these synthetic regulatory starting materials at its facilities at West Deptford, New Jersey, and Devens, Massachusetts, using their commercial-scale production trains, the company says.

The new agreement strengthens the relationship between the two companies. “Our collaboration with Sarepta signifies our continued commitment to existing and future PPMO and PMO programs, and Sarepta’s mission of engineering precision medicine for rare, devastating diseases,” says Alex Zahiri, vice president/innovator products and solutions, CDMO business at JM.

By: Sotirios Frantzanas

Source: Chemical Week

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