Sector News

Grace spinoff names Naren Srinivasan VP, Strategy and Corporate Development

October 20, 2015
Chemical Value Chain

W. R. Grace & Co. (NYSE: GRA) announced today that Naren Srinivasan has been named Vice President, Strategy and Corporate Development of GCP Applied Technologies Inc., the public company to be formed by the planned spin-off in early 2016 of Grace’s Construction Products segment and its Darex Packaging Technologies business.

Upon the split, Srinivasan will lead GCP’s global strategy and corporate development activities as well as the communications and customer applications functions. He will report to Gregory E. Poling, GCP’s designated President and Chief Executive Officer, and serve as a member of the new company’s leadership team. He will be located at GCP’s global headquarters in Cambridge, MA.

Srinivasan comes to GCP from The Hertz Corporation (NYSE: HTZ), where he was Senior Vice President, Global Strategy & Corporate Development. Srinivasan also held senior strategy and corporate development roles at Meadwestvaco Corporation. His previous private equity experience includes UBS Investment Bank; Five Arrows Capital; Evercore Partners; and Dillon, Read & Co.

“Strategy and Corporate Development—including our acquisition activity—will be a key role and vital to our growth strategy,” said Poling. “Naren is a talented leader with tremendous experience in this area, and we’re very excited he is now on the GCP team.”

GCP Applied Technologies will have customers in more than 110 countries, operations on six continents, and a team of 2,500 employees. Through applied knowledge and service excellence, GCP Applied Technologies provides premier specialty construction chemicals and specialty building materials for many of the world’s most renowned structures, and packaging technologies for the best-known consumer brands.

Source: Grace

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