Sector News

German carbon pricing plan may cost DAX companies billions: report

September 19, 2019
Chemical Value Chain

Germany’s blue-chip companies could face billions of euros in costs to cut carbon emissions under a climate protection plan due to be unveiled by the government on Friday, according to a study by asset manager Union Investment.

“According to our research, almost every one of the (30) DAX companies will be facing big challenges, even under low CO2 price scenarios,” said Henrik Pontzen, head of environmental, social and corporate governance at Frankfurt-based Union Investment’s portfolio management business.

Germany, which is responsible for just over 2% of the world’s greenhouse gases emissions, mainly aims to cap carbon emissions from buildings and transport.

Its utility sector has already made substantial reductions, forced by mandatory carbon permit trading (EU-ETS) in Europe that incentivises carbon efficiency.

But the country is on still track to miss targets to cut greenhouse gases emissions, of which CO2 is the main one, by 55% in 2030 from 1990 levels, having achieved less than 30% so far.

Union Investment said that putting a carbon price on areas not captured by the ETS could cost the DAX group of companies 5.2 billion euros ($5.7 billion) a year, an estimate it based on a price of 30 euros a tonne of CO2 equivalent.

This sum would be equivalent to 3.7% of the cumulative operating profit of the combined DAX group in 2018, it said.

It said possibly heavily affected companies included chemicals firms BASF, Covestro and Linde; steelmaker ThyssenKrupp; automotive companies BMW, Continental, Daimler, and Volkswagen; and building materials firm HeidelbergCement.

Berlin appears likely to set up a separate CO2 trading system for lagging sectors before integrating them into the ETS, while there are also proposals to impose CO2 taxes on them.

The C02 contract for December expiry on the ETS, which covers half of all polluting industries in the EU, is currently trading at 25.5 euros a tonne CFI2Zc1.

Pontzen said financial services and telecoms companies such as Allianz and Deutsche Boerse would be able to react quickly because they could replace their electricity needs with purely renewable energy-derived power.

“It will be decisive in the medium and long run, how fast companies can adjust their energy supply, modify business models and to what degree they can pass on additional costs to consumers,” he said.

By Vera Eckert

Source: Reuters

comments closed

Related News

November 28, 2021

Synthomer appoints new CFO

Chemical Value Chain

Synthomer announced the appointment of Lily Liu as Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Lily will take up the role no later than 1 July 2022, succeeding Steve Bennett who announced in August 2021 that he would step down once a suitable successor was in place.

November 28, 2021

Westlake to acquire Hexion’s epoxy business for $1.2 billion

Chemical Value Chain

Westlake Chemical (Houston, Texas) has reached agreement to acquire Hexion’s (Columbus, Ohio) epoxy business for approximately $1.2 billion. Westlake says the deal enhances chlorine and olefins integration and brings attractive opportunities in high-growth epoxy markets, including wind turbine blades, automotive lightweighting, aerospace and consumer coating applications.

November 28, 2021

Tetra Pak and Appetite Creative drive brand-consumer engagement with gamified carton experiences

Chemical Value Chain

Tetra Pak Iberia is launching a gamified app experience in partnership with digital studio Appetite Creative. The technology is enabled though scannable QR codes printed on drinking cartons and available to all brands in Southern Europe.

Send this to a friend