Sector News

Enercon Makes Major Management Change

September 22, 2014
Chemical Value Chain
Enercon Industries Ltd, the global leader in induction cap sealing, has made the biggest management change to the company in its 30-year-history.
 
Richard Bull, who has been Managing Director at the Aylesbury-based company, since its inception in the eighties, has been promoted to Chairman, while Kevin Lyons fills his former role.
 
The move is part of Enercon’s commitment to further strengthen its dominance of the European market following record-breaking sales in recent years. 
 
Richard Bull commented: “Despite the economic difficulties that the European Union has experienced since the global recession, Enercon has grown continually over the past five years and continues to do so.
 
“It is vital at this stage of Enercon’s development to ensure the business continues to thrive and we hope this new management structure will enable us to do this and maximise the exciting opportunities that lie ahead for Enercon.”  
 
Before joining Enercon, Kevin Lyons spent over 15 years working in the manufacturing industry. The last seven of those as Managing Director for Tema Machinery Ltd, a global company that supplies dewatering and processing equipment to industries including: food, dairy, pharmaceutical and chemical. 
 
Speaking about his appointment, Lyons said: “I am absolutely delighted to be taking up this role with Enercon to drive its business forward in Europe, whilst ensuring that the customer will continue to benefit from industry leading products, support and backup synonymous with the company’s traditions.
 
“It is an exciting time for Enercon as it looks to expand and develop its world leading range of induction cap sealing equipment and I look forward to being involved in that next generation of technologies,” he continued.  
 

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