Sector News

DuPont’s nutritional arm eyed by Royal DSM

September 17, 2019
Chemical Value Chain

DuPont’s nutrition and bioscience business may be up for sale and Amsterdam’s Royal DSM may want to buy it, according to a report from Bloomberg.

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The business could be valued at $25 billion, people who asked not to be identified told Bloomberg.

The specialty chemicals maker has been considering the sale or spinoff of its nutrition business, and has been in the process of selecting advisers to sort out offers for the division for some time, according to confidential sources.

In August, Bloomberg said that DuPont wanted to rid itself of the arm, and may be looking into a Reverse Morris Trust, a tax-free merger, as well.

Shares of DuPont fell 1.41% to $72.50 on Monday.

By Cherella Cox Owoyelu

Source: The Street

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