Sector News

Borealis received a binding offer from EuroChem for the acquisition of Borealis’ fertilizer, melamine and technical nitrogen business

February 4, 2022
Chemical Value Chain

Borealis, one of the world’s leading providers of advanced and circular polyolefin solutions and a European market leader in base chemicals, fertilizers and the mechanical recycling of plastics, has received a binding offer from EuroChem for the acquisition of Borealis’ nitrogen business including fertilizer, melamine and technical nitrogen products. The offer values the business on an enterprise value basis at EUR 455 million.

EuroChem is a leading global fertilizer producer, and one of only three companies worldwide with manufacturing capacity in all three primary nutrient groups: nitrogen, phosphates and potash. A vertically integrated company, EuroChem is expanding its production and distribution capacities in key regions around the world. The group has key manufacturing facilities in Russia, Belgium, Kazakhstan, and Lithuania, employing more than 27,000 people in 40 countries, and with a product reach of more than 100 countries.

The transaction would significantly enhance EuroChem’s nitrogen business in Europe, adding production assets in Austria, Germany and France as well as adding a comprehensive sales and distribution network utilizing the Danube river.

Borealis will initiate mandatory information and consultation procedures with employee representatives shortly. The transaction is also subject to certain closing conditions and regulatory approvals, with closing expected for the second half of 2022.

Borealis will continue to focus on its core activities of providing innovative and sustainable solutions in the fields of polyolefins and base chemicals and on the transformation towards a circular economy.

By Borealis, Press Release

Source: borealisgroup.com

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

France and Sweden both launch ‘first of a kind’ hydrogen facilities

Chemical Value Chain

France has launched an offshore green hydrogen production platform at the country’s Port of Saint-Nazaire this week, along with its first offshore wind farm. The hydrogen plant, which its operators say is the world’s first facility of its type, coincides with the launch of another “first of its kind” facility in Sweden dedicated to storing hydrogen in an underground lined rock cavern (LRC).

September 25, 2022

NextChem announces €194-million grant for waste-to-hydrogen project in Rome

Chemical Value Chain

The project sets up the Hydrogen Valley in Rome, the first industrial-scale technological hub for the development of the national supply chain for the production, transport, storage and use of hydrogen for the decarbonization of industrial processes and for sustainable mobility.

September 25, 2022

The problem with hydrogen

Chemical Value Chain

At first glance, hydrogen seems to be the perfect solution to our energy needs. It doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide when used. It can store energy for long periods of time. It doesn’t leave behind hazardous waste materials, like nuclear does. And it doesn’t require large swathes of land to be flooded, like hydroelectricity. Seems too good to be true. So…what’s the catch?