Sector News

Borealis appoints head of innovation & technology

May 26, 2020
Chemical Value Chain

Borealis has announced the appointment of Erik van Praet as vice president innovation & technology effective 1 April 2020. Van Praet succeeds Maurits van Tol, who last year moved to Johnson Matthey as chief technology officer and joined the management committee.

Van Praet started his career with Borealis in 1995 as development engineer at Zwijndrecht, Belgium, followed by various research manager positions at Porvoo, Finland; Stenungsund, Sweden; and the positions of intellectual property rights manager and technology commercialization manager at Mechelen, Belgium. Prior to joining Borealis, he worked at Desotec, a company specialised in air and water purification.

Most recently, Van Praet held the position of director strategy and portfolio for over a decade, first at Linz, Austria and then at Beringen, Belgium. “For many years, Erik van Praet has been a mastermind and key pillar of our ‘Value Creation through Innovation’ strategy, which remains a key differentiator of the Borealis polyolefin strategy,” said Lucrèce Foufopoulos, executive vice president/polyolefins, innovation and circular economy.

By: Natasha Alperowicz

Source: Chemical Week

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