Sector News

Alliance to End Plastic Waste names former UN official CEO

August 23, 2019
Chemical Value Chain

The Alliance to End Plastic Waste (AEPW), a nonprofit consortium of companies focused on plastics sustainability, has named Jacob Duer as the group’s first CEO, effective 1 October. Duer was most recently a program director at the United Nations Environment Program.

In the new role, Duer will lead AEPW in its mission to develop, deploy, and scale solutions to plastic waste problems, including reuse, recovery, and recycling. The group is aiming to help keep plastics out of the environment.

Duer’s “demonstrated leadership, passion for promoting sustainability, and track record of building solution-oriented multilateral partnerships will be an invaluable asset as the AEPW grows into this next phase,” says AEPW chairman David Taylor, who is also chairman and CEO of Procter & Gamble.

AEPW has committed $1.5 billion over five years to further its mission, and it has initiated projects on river renewal and information technology infrastructure, as well as partnerships with municipalities and the development of new ideas. The group’s members include many major chemical manufacturers, such as BASF, Dow, Sabic, and LyondellBasell, among others.

By Vincent Valk

Source: Chemical Week

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