Sector News

UK CVD costs to reach €23.1 billion by 2020: study

September 2, 2014
Life sciences

Cardiovascular disease is currently costing the UK €19.8 billion a year, and this figure is set to reach €23.1 billion by 2020, according to new research.

Direct and indirect costs of CVD represent 1.4% of UK Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and the nation carries the second-largest burden, after Germany, among six major European Union (EU) nations – the other four being France, Italy, Spain and Sweden. Together, these six countries account for 74% of the EU’s GDP and 64% of its population, and the total costs to them of CVD is set to soar from €102.1 billion by the end of 2014 to €122.6 billion by 2020, says the study, which has been published by the Centre for Economic and Business Research (Cebr).

Direct healthcare costs attributable to CVD currently total €81.1 billion across the six nations and they will have reached €98.7 billion by the end of the decade, while indirect costs from premature mortality and morbidity will rise from €19.6 billion and €1.4 billion, respectively, to €22.3 billion and €1.6 billion by 2020, the study estimates.

Mortality rates from the disease are set to increase from 1.12 million today to 1.22 million by 2020, and 93,584 of these deaths will be among the working-age population, it adds.

The study finds that Germany currently faces by far the highest cost from CVD out of the six nations, at €37.4 billion or 1.4% of GDP currently, and that this is set to rise to €41.3 billion. 

For France the current cost is €15.6 billion (0.8% of GDP), forecast to rise to €18.7 billion, while for Italy the increase will be from €18.3 billion (1.3% of GDP) to €23 billion. Spain’s costs will rise from €7.7 billion (0.7% of GDP) to €10.9 billion, and for Sweden they will increase from €4.3 billon (1% of GDP) to €5.3 billion.

Cebr economist and lead author of the report Sandra Bernick points out that the costs from CVD to the UK economy are large in comparison with other European nations, and that unless actions are taken to address this challenge, the economic burden will become ever more substantial.

The study was commissioned by AstraZeneca, which has called for a “continued, coordinated focus across industry, academia, healthcare systems and governments” in order to “address this epidemic head on.”

By Lynne Taylor

Source: Pharma Times

comments closed

Related News

October 17, 2021

Colorcon acquires a majority share in Ideal Cures Pvt. Ltd., India

Life sciences

Ideal Cures will operate as a fully independent entity within Colorcon. Their business complements Colorcon’s position in the Indian pharmaceutical market with a strong presence in the domestic generic sector comprised of long-standing customer relationships sustained by innovative and customized solutions.

October 17, 2021

Barriers exist, but participation urgent in breast cancer clinical trials: report

Life sciences

Across four new breast cancer treatments approved by the FDA last year, 2% to 9% of patients in clinical trials for the drugs were Black Americans and 0% to 9% were Hispanic, according to a new report from Breastcancer.org.

October 17, 2021

Danish consortium acquires part of Jernbanebyen to create one of the world’s healthiest urban villages

Life sciences

The southern section of Jernbanebyen in central Copenhagen has a new owner. The Baneby Consortium, comprising NREP, Novo Holdings and Industriens Pension, has bought the land from Freja Ejendomme. The ambition is to create a green, partly car-free environment that will also be one of the healthiest in the world. 

Send this to a friend