Sector News

UCB sheds speciality generics unit for $1.23bn

September 3, 2015
Life sciences

UCB is selling its speciality generics unit Kremers Urban Pharmaceuticals to US group Lannett for $1.23 billion.

The deal includes Kremers’ commercial portfolio of 18 products and 11 applications pending at the FDA, as well as its 381,000-square foot state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Seymour, Indiana.

The Belgian drugmaker said it plans to use proceeds from the divestiture to cut debt and increase its capacity for strategic investments, to further accelerate growth and/or strengthen its innovative medicines pipeline.

With unanimous backing from both UCB’s and Lannett’s boards of directors, the deal and is expected to close in the fourth quarter of this year, subject to customary closing conditions.

Osteoporosis drug beats Lilly’s Forteo
Meanwhile, UCB and Amgen said clinical data show that their experimental bone-building drug romosozumab was better at improving hip bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis than Lilly’s Forteo (teriparatide).

In the Phase III trial, around 436 postmenopausal women at high risk of fractures were switched from treatment with bisphosphonates (such as Merck & Co’s Fosamax) to either romosozumab or Forteo for 12 months.

Specific data were not revealed at this time, but the companies said the trial met its primary endpoint, with their drug showing a statistically significant improvement in bone density compared to Forteo.

By Selina McKee

Source: Pharma Times

comments closed

Related News

September 25, 2022

Rise of the machines: Novo Nordisk pledges $200M to create first quantum computer for life sciences

Life sciences

Big Pharma has long seen the potential for AI and machine learning to accelerate drug development. But Novo Nordisk is going a step further by channeling $200 million toward the creation of a computer that will outrun anything in existence.

September 25, 2022

Mount Sinai AI uncovers new brain analysis method to predict dementia, Alzheimer’s disease

Life sciences

Current methods for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease rely on a complex combination of self- and caregiver-reported symptoms, a physical examination and either a PET scan or a spinal tap to look for evidence of amyloid plaque build-ups in the brain. But a new artificial intelligence-based method may make the diagnostic process a much more objective one.

September 25, 2022

New AstraZeneca-backed report finds big money behind diverse owners and entrepreneurs in Europe

Life sciences

There is lots of talk about diversity and inclusion in business, including in pharma and medtech. A new report by the Open Political Economy Network (OPEN), a think tank focusing on migration and diversity, released its “Minority Businesses Matter: Europe” report highlighting the successes and challenges of ethnic minority-owned businesses in Europe.