Sector News

Researchers warn pandemic could delay cancer advances ‘by almost a year’

December 6, 2020
Life sciences

A new survey has detailed cancer researchers’ concerns that advances for patients could be delayed by nearly 18 months due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The survey included input from scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), London, who said that their own research advances would be delayed by an average of six months by the initial lockdown and subsequent restrictions.

The ICR surveyed 239 of its researchers to gain an in-depth picture of the impact that the pandemic has had on research and to identify ways of ‘moving forward’.

On average, respondents reported that they had lost ten weeks of research time during the first national lockdown, with their own scientific advances set to be delayed by an average of six months.

Nearly all respondents said that COVID-19 had impacted their work, with 36% reporting a ‘moderate impact’ and another 36% saying it had a ‘substantial’ impact.

The main problems caused by the impact included closure of labs during lockdown and subsequent restrictions in access to facilities and equipment, with 91% of respondents citing these issues.

Respondents also reported that an inability to enrol patients on clinical trials, access to clinical samples or interaction in person with colleagues had impacted their work.

“It is sobering to see that our researchers are estimating that their own research advances will be delayed by six months – and that the wider impact, because of the interconnectedness of science, is likely to push back major advances for patients by nearly a year and a half,” said Paul Workman, chief executive of the ICR, London.

“Our survey though does provide solutions to mitigate the impact – in the form of investment in staffing, new technologies and computing power. For that, we need more of the generous donations we have been receiving to our emergency appeal, along with a commitment from the Government to help fill the funding gap for the life sciences left by the pandemic,” he added.

by Lucy Parsons

Source: pharmatimes.com

comments closed

Related News

October 17, 2021

Colorcon acquires a majority share in Ideal Cures Pvt. Ltd., India

Life sciences

Ideal Cures will operate as a fully independent entity within Colorcon. Their business complements Colorcon’s position in the Indian pharmaceutical market with a strong presence in the domestic generic sector comprised of long-standing customer relationships sustained by innovative and customized solutions.

October 17, 2021

Barriers exist, but participation urgent in breast cancer clinical trials: report

Life sciences

Across four new breast cancer treatments approved by the FDA last year, 2% to 9% of patients in clinical trials for the drugs were Black Americans and 0% to 9% were Hispanic, according to a new report from Breastcancer.org.

October 17, 2021

Danish consortium acquires part of Jernbanebyen to create one of the world’s healthiest urban villages

Life sciences

The southern section of Jernbanebyen in central Copenhagen has a new owner. The Baneby Consortium, comprising NREP, Novo Holdings and Industriens Pension, has bought the land from Freja Ejendomme. The ambition is to create a green, partly car-free environment that will also be one of the healthiest in the world. 

Send this to a friend