Sector News

Charles River Labs cuts jobs as it closes San Diego site

April 3, 2019
Life sciences

After a number of pacts and buyouts over the past few years, Charles River Labs is cutting staff at one of its California sites.

According to a recent WARN notice, the CRO is cutting 24 employees from its San Diego site.

Charles River confirmed the cuts to FierceCRO today: “As part of our continuing efforts to streamline operations and enhance efficiencies, we have made the decision to close our research model production facility in San Diego and relocate all services and production to our Hollister site. Charles River is committed to maintaining its world-class client service and will ensure that the site closure will not impact availability or service.

“As part of this difficult but necessary decision, we are working with employees to ensure appropriate support and resources are in place as they seek new employment opportunities, both within and outside the company.”

Despite these cuts, over the past few months CRL has been spending, snapping up companies and making deals, including just two months back buying up early-stage CRO Citoxlab. A month before, it also went all-in for British CRO KWS BioTest in a £15 million ($20 million) deal. It’s also penned a new pact with Crown Bioscience for expanded access to the Zucker Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rat model.

By Ben Adams

Source: Fierce Biotech

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