Sector News

Astellas sets up immune tolerance JV in $760m deal

June 4, 2015
Life sciences
Japanese drugmaker Astellas and Swiss biotech Anokion have hooked up in a deal worth $760 million to create a new US-based firm focused on developing novel immune tolerance therapeutics.
 
Kanyos Bio, which is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, will initially work on clinical candidates for type I  diabetes and coeliac disease, although Astellas has the option to add a third autoimmune indication.
 
The firm will utilise Anokion’s tolerance-inducing technology shown to induce immune tolerance to protein drugs and autoimmune antigens in animal models, in an approach that the firm says “can be translated to virtually any protein in a myriad of clinical indications”. 
 
Astellas will provide non-dilutive research funding to Kanyos and holds an option to snap up the firm after reaching certain milestones, and will also take part in a $16 Million equity financing for new group alongside existing Anokion investors to secure some early cash.
 
By Selina McKee
 
Source: Pharma Times

comments closed

Related News

November 28, 2021

Founder-led biotech is making space for ideas—and diverse leaders—where it didn’t exist before

Life sciences

Decades ago, the founder-led biotech was rare and considered the tougher path to follow. Now there is a trend of founder-led biotechs that have risen in prominence in recent years, going from startup to well known with lightning speed. Scientists-turned C-suite occupants know their technology inside out. They’ve got credibility both at the bench working with their research teams and in the boardrooms selling their future products.

November 28, 2021

Pfizer to become $100B behemoth next year thanks to COVID-19 drug and vaccine: analyst

Life sciences

Pfizer’s revenue could reach $101.3 billion in 2022, with major contributions coming from the company’s BioNTech-partnered COVID vaccine and an antiviral therapeutic that has shown stellar clinical data, SVB Leerink analyst Geoffrey Porges projected in a Monday note to clients.

November 28, 2021

GlaxoSmithKline takes aim at sick pay access inequities with microgrant program and new campaign

Life sciences

In a survey commissioned by GlaxoSmithKline’s consumer health division of 2,000 working people in the U.S., almost 70% admitted to clocking in while sick, often because they couldn’t afford to lose a day’s pay. Black and Latina women were 10% more likely than white women to shun taking sick time for fear of fallout from their boss, according to the company’s 2021 Temperature Check Report.

Send this to a friend