Sector News

A record number of biotechs are going public. Here’s how they’re performing.

January 15, 2022
Life sciences

Initial public offerings are the lifeblood of the biotech industry. Stock listings give young companies access to the vast amount of cash necessary to advance their drugs through clinical development, and their venture backers a crucial opportunity to earn a return and form new biotechs.

At the start of the last decade, the IPO markets weren’t receptive to biotech companies. But by 2013, public investment was pouring into the industry, drawn by scientific advances and boosted by the newfound interest of a broader range of investors.

Ever since, biotechs and their backers have ridden a multi-year boom. Many young drugmakers, including those still years from human trials, have gone public at valuations never thought possible in the 2000s. Records have been made, and broken, several times over. Last year, a new high water mark was set during the deadliest pandemic in a century.

But a lucrative IPO doesn’t mean the company will thrive. Which biotechs create value over time, and which fail? What types of companies are generating the best returns? Who are their top investors? READ MORE

By Ben Fidler

Source: biopharmadive.com

comments closed

Related News

January 23, 2022

UCB to acquire Zogenix

Life sciences

UCB (Euronext: UCB) and Zogenix (NASDAQ: ZGNX) announced that the companies have entered into a definitive agreement under which UCB would acquire Zogenix, Inc., a global biopharmaceutical company commercializing and developing therapies for rare diseases.

January 23, 2022

argenx announces VYVGART™ approval in Japan for the treatment of generalized myasthenia gravis

Life sciences

argenx SE, a global immunology company committed to improving the lives of people suffering from severe autoimmune diseases, announced that Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) has approved VYVGART™ (efgartigimod alfa) intravenous infusion for the treatment of adult patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) who do not have sufficient response to steroids or non-steroidal immunosuppressive therapies (ISTs).

January 23, 2022

GlaxoSmithKline rejects Unilever’s $68B consumer health buyout offer, but a bigger bid is brewing

Life sciences

GSK has rejected three offers from Unilever to buy GSK’s consumer health unit, the company said Saturday. The latest offer from the fellow U.K. consumer goods giant, received Dec. 20 for a total value of 50 billion pounds ($68 billion), “fundamentally undervalued” the business and its prospects, GSK said.

Send this to a friend