Sector News

OSI Group to co-manufacture the Impossible Burger

July 31, 2019
Food & Drink

REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. — Impossible Foods has added manufacturing capacity to process the Impossible Burger by entering into a co-manufacturing agreement with OSI Industries. The access to additional processing capacity comes as Impossible Foods plans to introduce the Impossible Burger in retail outlets later this year.

“We conducted an exhaustive due diligence process to determine how to scale our manufacturing, both in the short term and over the next several years, and we were thoroughly impressed with OSI’s commitment to quality and responsiveness,” said Sheetal Shah, senior vice-president of product and operations, Impossible Foods. “OSI has already installed equipment to make the Impossible Burger, and we’ll start seeing new capacity every week.”

Impossible Foods has tripled its weekly production at its manufacturing plant in Oakland, Calif., according to the company. OSI Group, Aurora, Ill., has more than 65 plants in 17 countries and supplies value-added protein products to customers around the world.

“We look forward to lending our expertise to Impossible Foods as it embarks on one of the most ambitious start-ups in the food industry,” said Kevin Scott, senior executive vice-president of OSI North America. “At the same time, Impossible Foods will help fulfill the OSI Group’s commitment to sustainable food production – one of the core prisms through which OSI management makes operational decisions.”

By: Keith Nunes

Source: Food Business News

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