Sector News

Nestle to cut 400 jobs in France

January 29, 2018
Food & Drink

Swiss food group Nestle said on Friday it planned to cut as many as 400 jobs in France in support services and HQ functions, as it sees to cut cost and boost efficiency, confirming a media report.

The group, which employs 13,000 people in France, wanted to avoid layoffs and attrition may account for some reduction in headcount as Nestle consolidates seven sites around Paris into one by 2020, a spokesman said.

Earlier this week, Europe’s largest retailer Carrefour unveiled a voluntary redundancy plan for 2,400 employees at its French head office as part of plans to save 2 billion euros by 2020.

Nestle, the world’s largest packaged food firm, already announced in September plans to cut 450 out of 550 jobs at its Galderma skincare research center near Nice on the French Riviera.

Nestle has come under pressure to shift gear from activist shareholder Third Point, which in June revealed a $3.5 billion stake. Nestle has satisfied some demands, such as buying back shares and setting a margin target.

By Dominique Vidalon

Source: Reuters

comments closed

Related News

February 4, 2023

Unilever names FrieslandCampina’s Hein Schumacher as next CEO

Food & Drink

Schumacher will replace Alan Jope, who announced his decision to retire last September, less than a year after a failed attempt by Unilever to buy GlaxoSmithKline’s consumer healthcare business and just months after activist investor Nelson Peltz joined the company’s board.

February 4, 2023

Tetra Pak execs flag plant-based ice cream development hurdles as indulgent offerings expand

Food & Drink

Globally, plant-based ice creams have doubled their share of the market over the last five years, according to Tetra Pack. Pea protein and coconut milk are leading the way, but Tetra Pak cites data showing that oat-based ice cream launches have doubled in the previous year.

February 4, 2023

Examining the meaning of eco-labels: Is it time for mandated methodology?

Food & Drink

A myriad of so-called eco-labels are being rolled out across various F&B products, but with no gold standard or strict rules governing precisely what the logos mean and what methodology is behind them, concerns are growing that they will confuse consumers and ultimately be counterproductive.

How can we help you?

We're easy to reach