Sector News

5 rebel food industry leaders

June 15, 2016
Food & Drink

Big Food is big. With such size comes a lot of baggage: 100-year-old brands, factories that sacrifice flexibility for throughput and leaders who are forced to placate activist investors.

But Big Food has begotten a handful of leaders who have gone against the grain and found success, who have created new categories or changed their companies and, in so doing, have changed the entire food industry. Or at least are trying to. There’s nothing intrinsically wrong with size; as one of our subjects, Gary Hirshberg, puts it, only Big Food can make big changes.

The editors of Food Processing developed a list of people who fits this persona, then we vetted that list with our Editorial Advisory Board, who made some new suggestions. While there are more people deserving of the recognition, we look at the changes effected by Denise Morrison of Campbell Soup, Sam Reed of TreeHouse Foods, Jim Koch of Boston Beer Co., Scott Mandell of Enjoy Life Foods and Hirshberg of Stonyfield Farm/Danone.

> Read the full article on the Food Processing website

Source: Food Processing

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