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2 Sisters plans US$1.79m investment in Welsh facility

August 22, 2017
Food & Drink

Britain’s biggest food manufacturer, 2 Sisters Food Group, has announced plans to expand supply from its Welsh processing facility in Merthyr Tydfil, UK.

The £1.4 million (US$1.79 million) investment in the beef and sheep plant that kicked off at the end of last month will be spent on modernizing the beef boning hall and improving efficiency, quality and process control.

Ranjit Singh, 2 Sisters CEO said: “Investment in the boning hall will ensure that we create a leaner, more efficient supply chain at our flagship facility in Wales.”

“I’m confident that our Better Before Bigger strategy with its efficiency platform will put us in a good place for the long-term.”

Andrew Cracknell, MD at 2 Sisters Red Meat said: “The investment in our cutting operation will future proof jobs at the site and provide the platform for additional growth in beef sales over the next decade.”

Source: Food Ingredients First

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