Sector News

Getting serious about diversity: enough already with the business case

November 22, 2020
Diversity & Inclusion

Leaders may mean well when they tout the economic payoffs of hiring more women and people of color, but there is no research support for the notion that diversifying the workforce automatically improves a company’s performance. This article critiques the popular rhetoric about diversity and revisits an argument the authors made 25 years ago: To fully benefit from increased racial and gender diversity, organizations must adopt a learning orientation and be willing to change the corporate culture and power structure.

Four actions are key for leaders: building trust and creating a workplace where people feel free to express themselves; actively combating bias and systems of oppression; embracing a variety of styles and voices inside the organization; and using employees’ identity-related knowledge and experiences to learn how best to accomplish the firm’s core work. Read more

by Robin J. Ely and David A. Thomas

Source: hbr.org

comments closed

Related News

May 21, 2022

Gender equality, equity and balance: Milepost 2022 

Diversity & Inclusion

Equality. Equity. Balance. These terms are widely used but they hold different meanings to different audiences. AESC talked to several members of the AESC Diversity Leadership Councils to consider gender representation at the tops of organizations, setting a marker for progress so far and mapping the path to parity.

May 15, 2022

Reframing the concept of networking for women entrepreneurs: relationships, not networks

Diversity & Inclusion

Networking is a tricky word — especially for women in business. For some, networking conjures up images of crowded rooms full of people in suits exchanging business cards. For others, it might feel like asking someone to do something for you, which can be uncomfortable for many women.

May 7, 2022

How women can identify male allies in the workplace

Diversity & Inclusion

To spot a male ally, start by looking for indicators of growth and opportunity in your workplace. Then, seek out individuals you recognize a practicing allyship behaviors. Beware of performative allyship, where there is no action behind their words. Finally, reach out to establish a relationship.