Sector News

Disclosure will not solve the lack of diversity on boards

June 11, 2019
Diversity & Inclusion

General Motors shareholders last week elected a slate of directors that includes more women than men. The automaker is just one of four members of the S&P 500 with a majority-female board, evidence that the shift towards gender parity remains disturbingly slow.

But there is no agreement on how to accelerate the process. Much effort focuses on disclosure. The US Securities and Exchange Commission in February required companies to disclose whether particular board candidates were selected by taking into account self-reported diversity characteristics, and Democrats in Congress are pushing a bill to force companies to reveal diversity data about boards and executives.

> Read the full article on the Financial Times website

By Teresa Johnson

Source: Financial Times

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